Posted by: atowhee | August 26, 2017

MIGRATION THROUGH CARLTON

August 26, 2017

 

At Wennerberg and Carlton this morning there were migrants on view.  Barn Swallows, and Red-necked Phalarope are certainly on the move.  The young Chipping Sparrow most likely came from somewhere else as well. The Willow Flycatchers are more uncertain as to where they might have come from.BARSLINESwallows above, online or on line. They were along Shelton Road. Chipper below, followed by the phalarope quartet, playing shorebird twirl in B Major.CHIP YNGFOR PHAL1Phalaropes were on Carlton Sewer Ponds.FOR PHAL2The Willow Flycatchers, sparrows, warbler and a group of Bushtits were all along the creek.  At first I could no ID the small, long-tailed bird that crossed the creek back-lit and too fast for my binocs…then another, then a pair, than another single…and so it went until the whole nomadic village of Bushtits had the crossed the twenty-foot gap of open air and danger.  By the fifth one it was clear that only a Bushtit clan could create such a spasm of mobility.

In two years of birding records from Wennerberg I have only one previous Willow Flycatcher sighting, that was in June…so it’s possible they bred there this year. I have only a handful of Steller’s Jay sightings and none during May-July so I assume these are wandering birds after the breeding season. There are some large conifers at the park but not dense enough, I think, to attract a breeding pair.  Further up or down stream they could find most hospitable habitat for bringing new Steller’s from egg to feather. Scrub-jays are a fixture there, of course.

The oak grove there is re-grown from trees cut decades ago.  At the base of two you can still see the trunks of the parent tree, or at least the most recent previous generation.  How old are the connected underground root systems in this grove?  How long do oak roots live?  Are we approaching immortality here until the climate changes or a volcano erupts?OAK OLD (2)OAK OLD

Oak root systems: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/root-system-oak-trees-48319.html

Oregon white oak: http://owic.oregonstate.edu/oregon-white-oak-quercus-garryana

Along Westside Road I found two predators, one large and one much smaller.  The Great Blue Heron was in the full sun, in a parched, mown hay field.  He was visibly panting to keep his temperature down.  Dry work at a dry site.  Not far away a female Kestrel was dining on vole tartare in an al fresco picnic spot with views to the horizon (the crossbar on a utility pole at least thirty feet up).GBH PANTSKEST-DINEKEST-DINE2KEST-DINE3KEST-DINE4KEST-DINE5KEST-DINE6KEST-DINE7KEST-DINE8KEST-DINE9

TVs ON BAKER CREEK ROAD

Yesterday I got to watch a flock of nine Turkey Vultures at a carrion site right along the road.  I couldn’t tell what was on the menu because of grass and a steep slope above the roadway.TV-BC1TV-BC2TV-BC3TV-BC4TV-BC5TV-BC6TV-BC7TV-BC8Wennerberg Park, Carlton, OR, Yamhill, Oregon, US
Aug 26, 2017 10:15 AM – 11:15 AM.
15 species

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  1
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)  1
Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus)  1
Downy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Picoides pubescens gairdnerii/turati)  1
Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii)  2
Steller’s Jay (Coastal) (Cyanocitta stelleri [stelleri Group])  3
California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  2
Barn Swallow (American) (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster)  3
Bushtit (Pacific) (Psaltriparus minimus [minimus Group])  20
Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus)  1
Wilson’s Warbler (Cardellina pusilla)  1
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  1
Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana)  1
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  6

MY MCMINNVILLE-BASED FALL BIRDING CLASS IS NOW OPEN FOR REGISTRATION. CLICK HERE FOR THE PARK 7 REC PROGRAM GUIDE. THE BIRD CLASS IS ON PAGE 24. OCT, 7 THRU 21. THREE TALKS, THREE WALKS.


Responses

  1. Great that you sent this. I and the squirrels and the jays have planted about 25 little oaks around the place. I put the sprouted acorns they planted and forgot on the terraces above the house. I imagine this was a conifer forest that was clear cut and the oaks moved in. They sure are slow growers which accounts for why they cost so much at the nursery which must keep them for years before they are large enough to sell.

    Here is what the article taught me and I am doing it a bit wrong:

    Recently planted trees, on the other hand, should be watered weekly through summer. Watering is particularly critical from March to May to support the trees’ new growth. For more established trees, never water close to the base of the tree, and don’t water during the normal dry period in July and August.

    Many thanks. What has you so interested in oaks these days? Maybe your book research.

    No sign of Grizzly. I gotta get outta here, but I am not deserting my tomatoes!

    m a


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