Posted by: atowhee | October 22, 2019

HERE’S A RIPE MANGO FOR YOU

These are photos of a Green-breasted Mango, to be precise.  All photos by Wayne Easley, taken at Rancho Naturalista, Costa Rica:

Here is Wayne’s commentary on this gorgeous species:

“The Green-breasted Mangos are fairly large hummingbirds that have lots of bells and whistles.  They are one of the more common species that frequents the gardens of Rancho Naturalista, a birding lodge located about forty-five minutes from Turrialba.  This hummer is a feast for the eyes.  The male bird is green with a purplish black stripe down the throat and chest that is bordered by a glittering blue-green color.  When feeding, the birds often fan their deep magenta-colored tails in a dazzling display of beauty. It is suggested (have to admit I have not seen this) that the males court the less colorful females by flying in a U shaped direction in front of the females.  The female itself has less color than the male but it does have a blackish-green stripe on the white neck and chest.

“After the mating process, the birds go their separate ways; the female builds a neat little cup nest high in the trees or sometimes on a utility pole.  Meanwhile, the male is busy guarding his favorite feeding spot; either a feeder or a patch of flowers. Once the nest is ready, the mother deposits two tiny eggs which will hatch in two weeks or so.  The nest is so small and so compact that, even on cold nights, the chicks are not bothered by the cold. The fledglings remain in the nest after hatching for a couple more weeks.”

“Mangos range from NE Mexico south to Costa Rica.  They were seen in the United States for the first time in 1988 and since then have been spotted on about twenty occasions.  One bird was seen in July as far north as Wisconsin. Due to the approaching cold weather, the bird was captured and sent to the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago.  It is thought that as many as five subspecies can be found among the mangos.  That would indicate, that in the future. they may be split into more species.”

 


Responses

  1. Reblogged this on Wolf's Birding and Bonsai Blog.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: