Posted by: atowhee | December 30, 2013

ASHLAND CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT–A HISTORY

TODAY THERE IS AN ARTICLE IN THE ASHLAND NEWSPAPER ABOUT THIS YEAR’S CHRISTMAS COUNT. CLICK HERE TO SEE ARTICLE.

This January 4, 2014, will be the fourth annual Ashland CBC. There are species we find in large numbers each year. There are those we find, usually in limited number. There are species we’ve found only once or twice. Finally, there are species that are here sometimes in winter but still uncounted. Last year we had 118 species, our highest total so far. Medford this year had 119.
Every year so far the American Robin has been our most numerous species. This year promises to be the same. Last year we set a record with over 6700 Robins.AMRO BRITE-1 That record could be broken if the numbers along Lithia Park are typical of our whole count circle. Starlings may be our second-most abundant species, numbering over 1000 annually. Juncos are usually in competition with over 1800 two years.
Among the species we’ve found annually, but in limited numbers: Cackling Goose (high was 109 in 2011), Pintail (high of 4 in 2012), Lesser Scaup (25 in 2012), Pied-billed Grebe (8 in 2011), Western Grebe (7 in 2010) but none have been seen recently at Emigrant Lake, Great Egret (4 in 2012), White-tailed Kite (5 in 2011), Bald Eagle (4 in 2010), Harrier (13 in 2012), Sharpie and Cooper’s Hawk (6 each in 2011), Red-shouldered (7 in 2012), Golden Eagle (6 in 2011 & 2012), Merlin (11 in 2011), Peregrine (4 in 2012), Wilson’s Snipe (18 in 2010), Screech-Owl (1 annually), Pygmy-Owl (2 in 2010, 2012), Kingfisher (8 in 2011), Red-breasted Sapsucker (16 in 2012), Hairy Woodpecker (8 in 2012), Pileated (7 in 2012), Black-billed Magpie (3 in 2010, 2012), Brown Creeper (18 in 2011), Marsh Wren (6 in 2010), dipper barelegsDipper (4 in 2011), Townsend’s Solitaire (11 in 2012), Hutton’s Vireo (1 in 2011, 2012), Wrentit (5 in 2011), Townsend’s Warbler (2 in 2012), Savannah Sparrow (3 in 2010), Lincoln’s Sparrow (13 in 2011), White-throated Sparrow (7 in 2012), Evening Grosbeak (24 in 2012).

Birds we’ve seen in two of the three years: Gadwall (3 in 2012) and this year there have been some on Emigrant Lake, Ruddy Duck (39 in 2011) and many this year at Emigrant Lake, Mountain Quail (32 in 2010), Prairie Falcon (5 in 2012), Barn Owl (3 in 2012), Say’s Phoebe (2 in 2010), Brown-headed Cowbird (3 in 2011), Cassin’s Finch (12 in 2010), Red Crossbill (16 in 2012). Also we saw no Eurasian Collared-Doves the first count, 2010, but they are now common in much of Ashland below the boulevard so we will get dozens again this year.

Birds seen only on one count: Both Goldeneyes in 2010 when Keene Creek Reservoir was not frozen. It is going to be iced over this year for sure. Eurasian Wigeon (1 in 2010), Canvasback (1 in 2011), Pheasant (2 in 2010), Rough-legged Hawk (1 in 2012), Eared Grebe (1, 2011), Double-crested Cormorant (cw in 2012), Va. Rail (1 in in 2011), Sora (1 in 2010), Spotted Sandpiper (3 in 2011), Cal. Gull (1 in 2012), Spotted Owl (1, 2012),Lewis's Woodpecker Lewis’s Woodpecker (89 in 2012) and they’re present this year as well, White-headed Woodpecker (2 in 2012),
wh wood in flite Northern Shrike (1 in 2012), Gray Jay (5 in 2012), Rock Wren (1 in 2010), Canyon Wren (CW in 2011), Lazuli Bunting (1 in 2010), Rusty Blackbird (1 in 2012).

Not seen yet but possible: a vagrant duck (say, Cinnamon Teal or Surf Scoter), the two grouse, Osprey (not on such a cold year as this), Ferruginous Hawk,ferru-big mouth Goshawk, Ring-billed Gull, Herring Gull, Hammond’s Flycatcher, Clark’s Nutcracker, Tree or other swallow, Pygmy Nuthatch, Mountain Bluebird, Mockingbird, Orange-crowned Warbler, Swamp, Lark or Harris’s Sparrow, Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch. A Swamp Sparrow is apparently going to winter at North Mountain Park near the feeders.

Remember, count week starts January 1. Please report any bird of interest in the Ashland Count Circle.

[CW= count week bird not seen on official count day]


Responses

  1. […] blog for awesome photos of the Great Gray Owl, a list of all the birds seen on count day, and the history of the Ashland Christmas Bird Count. Ashland was the only count circle in Oregon to observe a Great gray Owl. Want to add the great […]


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