Posted by: atowhee | August 21, 2013

HEAVY TRAFFIC: RETERNS AND BIRDING WITH JAYS

OWL FACE
OWL EYES (1013x1280) This is not a bird I would ever include on my expected list for Emigrant Lake. And I didn’t find him, the screaming Scrub-Jays did. I followed their noise and then I followed this hapless fellow, harassed by jays, then bombed by a Red-tail and even some lowly Crows. Each time the skittish owl hid in the oaks above the Emigrant Lake’s south end quarry. This is the first owl of any species I have ever recorded at Emigrant Lake. Seems a Pygmy-Owl or wintering Short-eared would be more likely but this guy may have wandered in from a nearby ranch.
A Barn Owl wide awake in an oak in broad daylight–nice treat even though he was having a hard time. Hard to be invisiable when you’re white against a blue sky or dark green trees.
Lots of good birding at the lake this morning. Many birds on the move from warblers to accipiter.
When I was there mid-morning, seven of the Caspian Terns were still hanging around from the bigger flock Forrest English had seen earlier.RETERNS PLUS GULSRETERNS

WATERBIRDS
I really like this picture of a trio of “waterbirds.” None of these would be comfortable in a dry habitat. But each has evolved a very different mode of using and thriving around the water. The cormorant gets water-logged so he can dived deeper for fish. The Mallard is strictly superficial. He feeds on the surface of land and water. The Caspian Tern is a buoyant, graceful flyer who plucks his food from the top layer of the water. Like the cormorant he is at home only over or on water or shore, never foraging in a field like the Mallard, or some smaller terns [Black]. The Caspian is the largest tern in the world and is found around the Palearctic.

cro-signI don’t think this Crow has the proper permit to use this parking space.

C-G-SQ Every gardener’s favorite neighbor, the dig-your-roots, then-eat-em ground squirrel.
HOFI FOUR
Family group of House Finches.
GB H UP STRAITGBH UPCLOSEGBH STMPD
Migrants today included a Cooper’s Hawk, harassed by Jays, in turn he strafed a Crow. Orange-crowned and Yellow Warblers, shorebirds (except Killdeer), White Pelican, Caspian Tern, swallows.

Emigrant Lake, Jackson, US-OR. Aug 21, 2013 9:45 AM. 42 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 38
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 18
Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca) 2
Western Grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis) 2
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 2
American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) 1
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 2
Great Egret (Ardea alba) 1
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 7P1690508
Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) 2
White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus) 1
Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 1
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) 4
Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) 1
Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri) 12
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) 30
Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus) 4DOWCHR X4
Dowitchers Quartet, probing.
California Gull (Larus californicus) 3
Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) 1
Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia) 7
Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) 2
Barn Owl (Tyto alba) 1
Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) 9
Black Phoebe (Sayornis nigricans) 1
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) 13
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 6
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 75swalos on line
Both swallow species in mixed flock along the power lines.
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 50
Oak Titmouse (Baeolophus inornatus) 2OTIT--OCWA
Below the oak Titmouse you can see a hiding Orange-crowned Warbler.
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) 1
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) 3
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 24
Orange-crowned Warbler (Oreothlypis celata) 1
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 2
California Towhee (Melozone crissalis) 1
Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) 1
Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) 1
Brewer’s Blackbird (Euphagus cyanocephalus) 35
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 8
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 1


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