Posted by: atowhee | August 16, 2012

BANDON GALLERY

Black Turnstone, one of three hiding beneath the Bandon boat docks. This species is always amnong the earliest coastal migrants. Other migrating shorebirds around: Whimbrel, Greater Yellowlegs, scads of Western Sandpiper, Plovers still sporting their Black-bellied look. When the turnstones are aflutter you notice the relative long wings they carry, like many shorebirds that migrate long distances on pointed wings. And those long wings aid them in escapeing predators, but it doesn’t always work.

Here was a Bandon Peregrine dining on shorebird al fresco, ala carte, tartare. His abbatoir was right on the beach near all the strolling tourists, who noticed nothing, of course. The gulls may have been fascinated but they weren’t getting any closer. But soon a small coterie of admiring Turkey Vultures landed on the beach near Messr. Peregrine. I believe the prey had been a Killdeer in life. Right size and color for same.
LOONACY
A flock of about three dozen Pacific Loons, still bearing breeding plumage, were tiucked into the most sheltered cove at the Pt. Orford harbor. There they were out of the wind and high waves, feeding contentedly. After a scramble over seaweed slicked rocks I got within a couple yards to get some faint pictures. This is not a species I poften see that near shore. Not far from the end of the pier, a larger Common Loon was fishing alone. This bird is often quite close to land, as is the Red-throated Loon (smallest of the three you can expect to frequent Oregon’s coast in migration and winter).
PREVIOUS BANDON BLOGS
Pelican feather care

Something Fishy
Waxwings pass the berry
Bandon hope


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: