Posted by: atowhee | April 16, 2012

ASHLAND APRIL

It’s nesting time for many of the small songbirds that weather the winter here, not migrating to warmer places.Here is a Buhstit (upper left hand corner, gray blob) coming back to a nest being built by a pair of these tiniest songbirds. The nest is at the shallow end (where the inflow is) of Ashland Pond. It is a soft bag of woven grass hanging by a single suspension cable, also woven of grass. The nest is about ten inches long, the bird less than half that.This is a Hermit Thrush who hopped out of his hiding place in Lithia Park. This neighbor is present in all seasons but not often seen, and most often heard only during the spring sing. The Hermit Thrush does have a smoochy sounding warning note that is uttered from deep inside a brush redoubt, but generally this is a secretive bird seen just at the edge of lawn or path and then quickly dives back into cover and deep shade. It is a cousin of the more demonstrative American Robin.A “crowfile,” that woudl be crow in profile. Ashland Pond: Great Blue Heron, front and back.Golden-crowned Sparrow in tree at Dog Park. Hairy Woodpecker playing his wooden drum in front or our house. Red-winged Blackbird doing his macho display that earned him his name. Siskins bellying up to the feeder. Pond turtle and Wood Duck share log at Ashland Pond. Below, Mt. Ashland rises above spring sunshine, proclaiming the prolonging of winter’s influence. CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FULL SCREEN LANDSCAPE.


Responses

  1. Portlandia Killdeer http://photograham.wordpress.com/ Enjoy

  2. I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. -Joseph Addison, essayist and poet (1672-1719)

    In Ashland we might substitute “deer” for “blackbirds.”

    • And the blackbird which Addison wrote about is the European Blackbird, a close cousin to our American Robin with similar physique and habits and song, but freathers more suited to sooty London of the 18th Century


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