Posted by: atowhee | June 15, 2011

GETTING THERE IS MORE THAN HALF…

Well, not half the fun perhaps.  But getting to Malheur last week got our group of birders more than half of all the species we found.  We had over seventy species that first day on the road, out of 126 overall.  And four of the species we found at Malheur are among 20 common birds in serious decline according to National Audubon.  Pintail, Loggerhead Shrike, Lark Sparrow, Horned Lark.  Herewith some images from that first day on the road:

Clark’s Nutcracker, a pair was near the road in a Ponderosa/juniper forest west of Silver Lake in Lake County.

Mountain Bluebird nesting at Sage Hen Hill Rest Area west of Burns on US 20 where we saw at least three pairs.  Here’s a female:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wood Duck male hiding in Klamath Marsh NWR.

 

THE LANDSCAPE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Responses

  1. […] American Bittern (heard) east of MFS: Great Blue Heron; Great Egret; Black-crowned Night-heron; White-faced Ibis in the hundreds; Osprey at Howard Prairie and Collier State Park; Bald Eagle; Harrier; Swainson’s Hawk; Red-tailed Hawk, Ferruginou Hawk; Golden Eagle; Kestrel; Sora (heard); Common Moorhen–Klamath Marsh; Coot; Sandhill Crane including one chick see in deep grass along Lawen Road; Killdeer; Black-necked Stilt nesting; American Avocet nesting; Willet; Long-billed Curlew; Wilson’s Snipe; Wilson’s Phalarope; Franklin’s Gull, Ring-billed Gull; California Gull; Caspian Tern–Howard Prairie; Forster’s Tern; Black Tern; Eurasian Collared-Dove; Mourning Dove; Great Horned Owl–two families; Common Nighthawk in abundance, even feeding mid-day; Red-breasted Sapsucker at Collier SP; White-headed Woodpecker; Northern Flicker; Olive-sided Flycatcher–RP & HQ;  Western Wood-Pewee; Willow Flycatcher; Gray Flycatcher; Cordilleran Flycatcher–HQ; Say’s Phoebe–MFS and other places; Western Kingbird; Loggerhead Shrike; Cassin’s Vireo–HQ; Warbling Vireo; Steller’s Jay; Clark’s Nutcracker; Black-billed Magpie; American Crow; Raven; Horned Lark–The Narrows; Tree Swallow; Violet-green Swallow; Northern Rough-winged Swallow; Cliff Swallow; Barn Swallow; Red-breasted Nuthatch; White-breasted Nuthatch; House Wren; Marsh Wren; Mountain Bluebird–Sage Hen Hill Rest Area; American Robin; Sage Thrasher; Starling; Cedar Waxwing–HQ; Yellow Warbler–ubiquitous; Cape May Warbler–HQ; Common Yellowthroat; Wilson’s Warbler; Yellow-breasted Chat; Western Tanager; Green-tailed Towhee; Chipping Sparrow; Brewer’s Sparrow; Vesper Sparrow; Lark Sparrow–PS; Sage Sparrow–east of Silver Lake and at Malheur; Song Sparrow; Black-headed Grosbeak; Bobolink at Malheur on Central Patrol Rd and Diamond Road; Red-winged Blackbird; Western Meadowlark; Yellow-headed Blackbird; Brewer’s Blackbird; Brown-headed Cowbird; Bullock’s Oriole; Cassin’s Finch–Sage Hen Hill; Pine Siskin–HQ; American Goldfinch; House Sparrow.  In addition, one lady in our group saw a few Chukar on a rocky slope while the rest of us were mesmerized by a Loggerhead Shrike.    OTHER POSTS ABOUT THIS TRIP: Ashland to Malheur NWR, June 9. […]


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