Posted by: atowhee | December 15, 2010

Channeling Kazinga

The Kazinga Channel in Uganda brings water from George southwestward into Lake Edward.  The Kazinga Channel is a few hundred yards wide, less than 30 feet and the water moves slowly.  My map tells me there is only one meter difference in the average surface height from “upper” Lake George to “lower” Lake Edward.  From Edward the water flows further south, then elbows westward into Congo and turns finally northward whence it eventually feeds into the might northbound Nile River.  These lake names are an unmistakable remnant of the old British Colonial system.

We took a small motor launch onto the channel and along the marshy eastern bank.  Here’s just some of the dense wildlife we saw up close:

Elephants enjoying a bath.

Hippos happening in channel.  Note the white specks on yonder shore: gulls, terns, stork, et al.

Common Sandpiper–very similar to our Spotted Sandpiper–finds an uncommon landing site.

The Black Crake is similar in size and behavior to our Sora.

Being at the planet’s midriff, Uganda gets migrants from BOTH north and south.  This handsome character was up from southern Africa and about to go south for their breeding season.

Look at the diversity in this shot of one stretch of beach.  The big guy in the foreground is a Marabou.

Speckled head on the Sacred Ibis, made famous by generations of pharah’s and their scriveners.  Many more Kazinga shots, in next blog posting.  And here is a link to Kazinga #2.


Responses

  1. […] Here’s link to my first Kazinga Channel posting. […]


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